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Myocardial Infarction With Nonobstructive Coronary Arteries (MINOCA)

Myocardial infarction with nonobstructive coronary arteries (MINOCA) is clinically defined by the presence of the universal acute myocardial infarction (AMI) criteria, absence of obstructive coronary artery disease (≥50% stenosis), and no overt cause for the clinical presentation at the time of angiography (eg, classic features for takotsubo cardiomyopathy).

With the more frequent contemporary use of coronary angiography in AMI, clinicians have been regularly confronted with this puzzling problem and seeking guidance in its management. An article by Lindahl et al in this issue of Circulation represents a major step forward in MINOCA and thereby warrants taking stock of the past, present, and future management strategies of this intriguing condition.

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Research

2019 ESC Guidelines for the diagnosis and management of chronic...

Guidelines summarize and evaluate available evidence with the aim of assisting health professionals in proposing the best management strategies for an individual patient with a given condition. Guidelines and their recommendations should facilitate decision making of health professionals in their daily practice. However, the final decisions concerning an individual patient must be made by the responsible health professional(s) in consultation with the patient and caregiver as appropriate.

A great number of guidelines have been issued in recent years by the European Society of Cardiology (ESC), as well as by other societies and organizations. Because of their impact on clinical practice, quality criteria for the development of guidelines have been established in order to make all decisions transparent to the user.

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Research

Ischemia and No Obstructive Coronary Artery Disease

Determine the prevalence and correlates of microvascular and vasospastic angina in patients with symptoms and signs of ischemia but no obstructive coronary artery disease (INOCA).

Three hundred ninety-one patients with angina were enrolled at 2 regional centers over 12 months from November 2016 (NCT03193294). INOCA subjects (n=185; 47%) had more limiting dyspnea (New York Heart Association classification III/IV 54% versus 37%; odds ratio [OR], 2.0 [1.3–3.0]; P=0.001) and were more likely to be female (68% INOCA versus 38% in coronary artery disease; OR, 1.9 [1.5 to 2.5]; P<0.001) but with lower cardiovascular risk scores (ASSIGN score median 20% versus 24%; P=0.003).

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News

Twenty-Five Worldwide Renowned Cardiologists Give their Support to the IHSA

International Heart Spasms Alliance (IHSA) is a global initiative lead by experts through experience. These are patients who are living with coronary vasospasms and microvascular angina, while also working in a collaborative equal partnership with clinicians.

We have invited healthcare professionals from around the world to our alliance to work with us in an equal partnership. These are expert cardiologists and healthcare professionals who are interested in learning more about and further researching these NOCAD conditions. Together, we are looking to spread worldwide awareness to help further research and bring faster diagnoses to patients suffering from these often-overlooked heart conditions.

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Research

Diagnosis of patients with angina and non-obstructive coronary disease in...

Around 40% of all patients undergoing angiography are found to have normal coronary arteries or non-obstructive coronary artery disease (NOCAD). Despite the high prevalence, this is a group who rarely receive a definitive diagnosis, are frequently labelled and managed inappropriately and by and large, continue to remain symptomatic.

Half of this group will have coronary microvascular dysfunction (CMD), associated with a higher rate of major adverse cardiovascular events; identifying CMD represents a therapeutic target of unmet need. As the pressure wire has revolutionised our ability to interrogate epicardial coronary disease during the time of angiography, measuring flow can similarly classify NOCAD during a single procedure.

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Research

Angina: contemporary diagnosis and management

Around one half of angina patients have no obstructive coronary disease; many of these patients have microvascular and/or vasospastic angina. Tests of coronary artery function empower clinicians to make a correct diagnosis (rule-in/rule-out), complementing coronary angiography. Physician and patient education, lifestyle, medications and revascularisation are key aspects of management.

Ischaemic heart disease (IHD) remains the leading global cause of death and lost life years in adults, notably in younger (<55 years) women. Angina pectoris (derived from the Latin verb ‘angere’ to strangle) is chest discomfort of cardiac origin. It is a common clinical manifestation of IHD with an estimated prevalence of 3%–4% in UK adults. There are over 250 000 invasive coronary angiograms performed each year with over 20 000 new cases of angina.

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Research

Assessment of Vascular Dysfunction in Patients Without Obstructive Coronary Artery...

Ischemic heart disease secondary to coronary vascular dysfunction causes angina and impairs quality of life and prognosis. About one-half of patients with symptoms and signs of ischemia turn out not to have obstructive coronary artery disease, and coronary vascular dysfunction may be relevant.

Adjunctive tests of coronary vasomotion include guidewire-based techniques with adenosine and reactivity testing, typically by intracoronary infusion of acetylcholine. The CorMicA (Coronary Microvascular Angina) trial provided evidence that routine management guided by an interventional diagnostic procedure and stratified therapy improves angina and quality of life in patients with angina but no obstructive coronary artery disease.

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Research

Prognostic Links Between OCT-Delineated Coronary Morphologies and Coronary Functional Abnormalities...

Whether there are prognostic links between coronary morphologies and coronary functional abnormalities was examined in ischemia and nonobstructive coronary artery disease (INOCA) patients.

Although INOCA has attracted much attention, little is known about the prognostic impact of coronary morphologies in this disorder.

A total of 329 consecutive INOCA patients were enrolled and underwent spasm provocation testing combined with lactate sampling for diagnosis of epicardial and microvascular spasm (MVS).

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Research

International standardization of diagnostic criteria for vasospastic angina

Standardization of diagnostic criteria for ischemic symptoms due to coronary microvascular dysfunction (CMD) is needed for further investigation of patients presenting with anginal chest pain consistent with “microvascular angina” (MVA).

At the annual Coronary Vasomotion Disorders International Study Group (COVADIS) Summits held in August 2014 and 2015, the following criteria were agreed upon for the investigative diagnosis of microvascular angina…

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News

IHSA website launch

International Heart Spasms Alliance (IHSA) was founded by a group of four women which had a common goal: to do better. Terri Shumaker, Cindy McCall, Sarah Brown, and Annette Pompa all live in different parts of the world and have never met face-to-face.

Over a period of five years, these women have created and participated in different Facebook support groups which united them in a common purpose. They may have different backgrounds and experiences, but this medical condition appears to be as elusive as a unicorn in fairyland. There is no cookie cutter approach because each person is unique and does not present the same symptoms.

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Around The World

Real Patient Stories

Dima’s story

March 3rd, 2021 was the day that changed everything. At 55, I had a busy counselling practice and a few other projects on the go. The pandemic was causing anxiety for many of my clients and in my private life. I had a lot of stress of my own: there were safety issues in the building where I lived, and I was looking for a new apartment. Despite this, I thought I was handling it well. I was fairly healthy, I walked daily, ate well, meditated and didn’t smoke or drink.

I started to experience heavy fatigue towards the end of 2020 but told myself it was normal considering all that was going on in the world.

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MaryAnn’s story

When I was 39, with zero risk factors for heart disease, I had all the classic symptoms associated with a heart attack. My doctors put me on three blood thinners to dissolve a clot in a minor artery seen in an angiogram. The next day, while the original clot had dissolved, I had a clot in a larger artery. Baffled, the cardiologists put in a stent. As they backed the scope out of the artery, it spasmed in another location.

At that time, I had a 4-year-old, an 8-year-old, and a 12-year-old. My husband traveled extensively for work. I asked myself two questions: 1) How do I feel about dying at age 39? 2) If I don’t die, how do I live?

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Sandra’s story

My story began in January 2010, while sitting at a traffic light returning to the office. I was working as a home health physical therapist. I began having chest pain out of nowhere. I got to my office and my boss, an RN, asked me if I was OK. I told her about the chest pain. By then it was starting to progress down my left arm. She took my blood pressure, normally 98/68. It was 140/90. She called my husband and told him to meet me at the ER. I drove myself there. They ran the normal tests and diagnosed me with costochondritis. Pain meds made the symptoms go away. The pain came back six times in the next 6 months. I asked for a cardiologist referral, but was denied, due to my age (39), lack of family history, and being in shape.

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